Yoga does not remove us from the reality or responsibilities of everyday life but rather places our feet firmly and resolutely in the practical ground of experience. We don’t transcend our lives; we return to the life we left behind in the hopes of something better.
My body , my practice .  There is no need to be “perfect ” in any pose , or appeal to a specific body type .
Do your own thing , yoga is not for anyone else but yourself .

My body , my practice .
There is no need to be “perfect ” in any pose , or appeal to a specific body type .

Do your own thing , yoga is not for anyone else but yourself .

Acro yoga .
Love.
Breathe.
Just be.

Acro yoga .
Love.
Breathe.
Just be.

Strength and balance always remind you to just shut up and breathe

Strength and balance always remind you to just shut up and breathe

” Even educated people today believe they can find happiness outside of themselves and hold on to it. Our consumer societies pervasively reinforce this superficial expectation by advertising vacations or the purchase of various things as sources of real fulfillment. Others promise the same result if you vote for a certain political party or follow a new diet. And so people invest their energy , as well as the precious hours and years of their lives , in the search for an alleged happiness that they don’t understand or have the means to safeguard. Thus, holiday places are overfilled, women or men illogically destroy functioning relationships , hard - earned recognition at work transforms into malicious gossip because colleagues turn against someone , beloved children develop lifestyles that their parents can no longer connect with , or the family father dies suddenly, pensions that were invested in for a whole career are suddenly reduced , and diamond rings that were meant to be forever are lost.

The reason for this is clear : if happiness arises from impermanent causes, it can only last as long as its outer and inner conditions continue. When these circumstances fall away, any conditioned state will disappear. Like the Greek philosopher Heraclites said 2,500 years ago : “Everything flows. Nothing stands still. ” “

- Lama Ole Nydahl

Don’t let shark week get you down , there are a lot of things you can do to ease or get rid of PMS.

Exercise, ginger tea (or fresh ginger in smoothies or general snacking on it) and eating lots of fresh whole foods seriously helps. Also, for yogis out there, its generally advised to take a break for the fist few days of shark week to practice more restorative and relaxation yoga.

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-8034/9-diet-changes-to-help-conquer-pms.html

"1. Cut back on refined sugar, salt, caffeine (coffee, tea, and soft drinks), dairy, and alcohol.

These are all inflammatory in the body and worsen PMS symptoms.

2. Eat more fatty acids. 

Nuts, seeds, fish, or potent supplement (get help from your nutritionist on the supplement) are healthy sources of fatty acids, which have an anti-inflammatory effect. 

3. Increase fiber — fruit, veggies, legumes, seeds, and grains.

Fiber can help with cravings, balance hormones and absorbs the excess estrogen in the gut- preventing it from going into the blood and causing inflammation. 

4. Don’t be afraid of carbs — just stick to the good ones! 

Cut out all white and refined carbs and choose whole grain, quinoa, legumes, oats, or brown rice instead! 

5. Add phytoestrogens to your daily diet. 

Phytoestrogens can be found in beans, peas, legumes, flaxseeds, and can have a hormonal balancing effect. 

6. Increase calcium and magnesium consumption. 

Great sources of calcium and magnesium are nuts, seeds, and dark, leafy greens! Or, you can invest in a supplement form.

7. Up your intake of broccoli and cauliflower. 

These cruciferous veggies sweep out excess estrogen. 

8. Make sure to include protein with each meal.

Consuming protein — and snacking smartly — can help you beat cravings. 

9. Supplements to consider with assistance from your nutritionist:

Primrose oil, fish oil (essential fatty acids), B-complex, vitamins E and C, and magnesium. “

Don’t let shark week get you down , there are a lot of things you can do to ease or get rid of PMS.

Exercise, ginger tea (or fresh ginger in smoothies or general snacking on it) and eating lots of fresh whole foods seriously helps. Also, for yogis out there, its generally advised to take a break for the fist few days of shark week to practice more restorative and relaxation yoga.

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-8034/9-diet-changes-to-help-conquer-pms.html

"1. Cut back on refined sugar, salt, caffeine (coffee, tea, and soft drinks), dairy, and alcohol.

These are all inflammatory in the body and worsen PMS symptoms.

2. Eat more fatty acids.

Nuts, seeds, fish, or potent supplement (get help from your nutritionist on the supplement) are healthy sources of fatty acids, which have an anti-inflammatory effect.

3. Increase fiber — fruit, veggies, legumes, seeds, and grains.

Fiber can help with cravings, balance hormones and absorbs the excess estrogen in the gut- preventing it from going into the blood and causing inflammation.

4. Don’t be afraid of carbs — just stick to the good ones!

Cut out all white and refined carbs and choose whole grain, quinoa, legumes, oats, or brown rice instead!

5. Add phytoestrogens to your daily diet.

Phytoestrogens can be found in beans, peas, legumes, flaxseeds, and can have a hormonal balancing effect.

6. Increase calcium and magnesium consumption.

Great sources of calcium and magnesium are nuts, seeds, and dark, leafy greens! Or, you can invest in a supplement form.

7. Up your intake of broccoli and cauliflower.

These cruciferous veggies sweep out excess estrogen.

8. Make sure to include protein with each meal.

Consuming protein — and snacking smartly — can help you beat cravings.

9. Supplements to consider with assistance from your nutritionist:

Primrose oil, fish oil (essential fatty acids), B-complex, vitamins E and C, and magnesium. “

Earthly Beauty & Wellness

Friends have asked me to make a wellness blog, so here it is ! Feel free to check it out and follow if you’d like :)

Everything from yoga , recipes, and making holistic body care

I think one of the main reasons why I love yoga and cycling is because it forces you to be in your own skin, deal with all of the emotions and struggles that it brings, as well as all of the enjoyment and clarity that is opens up. Falling on your back out of a handstand or arm balance, gripping your hands to the handlebars as you are climbing a hill, sweat dripping down your face , trying to get your mind to shut up as you are sitting still, and the breath that is pushing you through it all. That sense of connection, that sense of being alive, and that sense of being in the present moment. I don’t know what I would do with out it, and I want to explore new ways of experiencing it. I sense a shift happening within myself, and I am really happy to embrace it.

Relationships should complement our identities, not define them

Relationships Should Complement Our Identities, Not Define Them

Editor’s Note: This is a contribution by Jenn Hourani

“On a deeper level you are already complete. When you realize that, there is a playful, joyous energy behind what you do.” ~Eckhart Tolle

The first rain after a long draught gets people talking about cozy things. Being with others, being physically close to others, going out in groups, staying in with someone. Sharing affection. Cold weather seems to always entail groups and partnerships.

What about when those groups and partnerships are missing from the tableau? The other night I was sitting in my apartment with my lanterns on, some incense burning, and some good reading material. The rain was trickling outside my window. The moment was perfect.

For once in my life, I didn’t have my normal thought: “This moment is so beautiful, but it would be better if someone was here to share it with me.” I was completely at peace, enjoying the presence of my own heart and mind.

This might not seem like a huge “Eureka!” moment, but it was for me.

I grew up an only child, so I’ve always craved that group interaction and the comfort of crowds. I made friends easily and was sometimes accused of serial monogamy; I was rarely single for longer than six months. I always felt surrounded—and by being surrounded, I felt protected.

Three months ago, however, I quit a job that made me unhappy and a relationship that was going nowhere, which had filled most of my time. I was face to face with myself in a frightening and jolting pause. I no longer had the noise of others to fill my silences.

Friends advised me to go out, work out, or find someone else. I did all three, sometimes in excess.

It alleviated my pain for a brief time. But I still felt hopeless, directionless. I took the long way in realizing something important: I needed to fall back in love with myself, which meant getting to know myself again, apart from the influences of everything else in my life.

I had spent so much time being something for others, filling my life with adaptation, that I had forgotten what it was like to be me.

I started journaling. I meditated for fifteen minutes each day. I forced myself to do something I hadn’t done in years: spend time alone, once a week, resisting the urge to text or e-mail. I purposely blocked out the static I had surrounded myself with for so long.

It wasn’t exactly easy. I truly believe that we need others. No matter what anybody says, we receive fulfillment from the interaction, reassurance, and influence of others.

My problem was that without all of this, I didn’t know who I really was, and admitting that meant that some serious reconstruction had to be underway.

My self-confidence inched its way back to me as I recaptured things I liked, wrote down my thoughts, and defined what my dreams and boundaries were. My inner self began to emerge, little by little.

In that process, I learned that while relationships complement our identities, it’s vital to form them from a sacred space within, or else that complementarity is just veiled dependency.

This renewed approach wasn’t just a brief answer to a state of crisis, however. It’s the way I’ve chosen to live my life. The concrete rules I made for myself were:

1. Think before deciding to do something.

Before automatically saying yes, ask yourself if it’s something you really want to be doing, and why.

2. Don’t cancel on old plans because new, seemingly more exciting plans come up.

Staying consistent is necessary to defining yourself, even if the lure of adventure seems to place consistency on the backburner sometimes. Yes, you want to stay impulsive and spontaneous, but you can balance that spirit of adventure with being reliable and resolute.

3. Take time to know yourself.

List what makes you feel good. List what kind of friend you want to be. List what you want to achieve in the next five years, no matter how small or grandiose. These things may change, according with how you change, but at least you can track that progression on paper, versus abstractly thinking about everything and getting lost in an ocean of questions and doubts.

4. This slightly contradicts my first rule, but let’s not confuse alone time with cooping yourself up at your place and shutting the world out.

Of course, it’ll always be easier to stay in the comfort of your living room with a meal and a movie. That can be good for you on some nights. But alone time is just one facet of connection with yourself.

Your next steps are to use what you learn on your own and then apply that to interaction out in your world. When you commit to going somewhere, doing something you’ve never tried, being out and about, you never know who you’ll meet, what you’ll see, and what small moments of illumination you’ll encounter.

These moments can bring you closer to who you are and what you want if you’ve learned to nurture your independence and identity first. So, maybe this rule isn’t a contradiction to number one; it’s the complement to it.

5. Allow some space for you and the ones you love.

She may be your best friend, or he may be the love of your life, or she may be a doting mother, but everyone needs time alone. We need it to recharge, to evaluate our choices, and to rest our minds.

It’s okay to not be joined at the hip with people you might wish you were joined at the hip with.

I’m still disoriented from having a long-term job and a partner, and now being single and job-searching.

The detachment process is sluggish. And, as life goes on and we invest ourselves more into each new venture, that detachment doesn’t get any easier.

Time makes us more afraid to leap into the unknown yet again, causing us to deny dissatisfaction and emptiness. But we owe it to ourselves to try.

It won’t always be easy to live for myself; I know that. It might be lonely and unsteadying.

But if I can enjoy a rainy night in the satisfaction of my own company, then I’m happy, because it means I’m strongly connected the one person who can fulfill me the most.

Photo by mrhayata

About Jenn Hourani

Jenn Hourani is a twenty-something-year old San Francisco native, focusing on writing and working. She can be found roaming the Mission and Sunset Districts. For more information, visit her online headquarters 00358800.tumblr.com.

“ Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built.” ~ Rumi


“ Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built.” ~ Rumi